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Cyber IQ Review [Summer 2016]

Cyber IQ Review [Summer 2016]

Welcome to the summer 2016 issue of the Cyber IQ Review. The past few months have been as active as ever when it comes to the increase and emergence of sophisticated threats to our digital information. Headline issues have spanned from flaws in daily security measures to global-scale controversy and serious commercial fallout.

This e-book includes new insight from experts within the field of information security, including strategic expert Ryan Lai on ransomware, and Dr. Chris Rivinus on developing an ‘InfoSec culture’. Alongside these, we offer access to some of the most impactful articles that Cyber IQ has released in the past six months, covering elements from national infrastructure protection to incident response. Meanwhile, readers will be able to find the results of our summer survey of cybersecurity professionals, in which we uncover some interesting trends and statistics, including what they believe to be the most critical vulnerabilities and where organizations are failing on implementing policies and procedures. Download the Cyber IQ Review today.
Germany’s IT Security Law: Beware the Regulatory Remedy

Germany’s IT Security Law: Beware the Regulatory Remedy

In 2015, the upper house of the German parliament approved the IT Sicherheitsgesetz or IT Security Law. The act obliged more than 2,000 designated “operators of critical infrastructure” to implement a range of new information security standards within a two year period or face government sanctions. Time is almost up for those organisations in the crosshairs, but will legislation be the cure-all for ICS cyber security woes? We spoke with Roger Cumming, the former Deputy Director for CPNI and a veteran of the industrial control systems landscape, to find out what he thought about the German initiative and why legislation should be treated with caution rather than a panacea. 

28 Solutions to the Cross-Sector ICS Nightmare

28 Solutions to the Cross-Sector ICS Nightmare

In February 2017, two researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology simulated a cyber attack on a water treatment plant. Using ransomware, the academics managed to access programmable logic controllers (PLCs) to shut off valves, increase the chlorine content of water and show false information on computer displays.

The ICS world is riddled with weaknesses that are ready to be exploited by switched-on wrongdoers for currency and chaos. In this analysis we look at five of the most dangerous roots of ICS breach and how to best prevent them.